The Unfortunate Politics of Gun Control

Gun control is unnecessarily wrapped up in politics in much the same way as climate change.

Republican politicians’ stances on those issues are used as important standards for their acceptability as candidates, regardless of the fact that there is technically nothing inherently conservative about either gun ownership, or rejecting the conclusions of climate scientists. To take a strong stand for limiting gun ownership, a Republican politician would have to do so with the understanding that they likely won’t get re-elected, and that most of their Republican colleagues won’t go along with them.

Democrats are also culpable. They’ve taken only half-measures in response to these incidents. Since gun ownership is not inherently a conservative phenomenon (despite the fact that Republicans seem to “own” the second amendment as their cause), they do not want to appear to take too strong a stand against gun ownership for fear they will lose moderates and Democrats who own guns. So, Democrats have crafted proposals that tweak gun ownership regulations only slightly. Many of their recent proposals would not have prevented the Las Vegas shooter’s ability to obtain the weapons he used to carry out his attack.

Guns are not the whole story. Guns are the means, but the shooter’s mindset provides the impetus to commit mass murder. As such, there are, at least, two ways to approach this problem.

We can try to make almost impossibly large strides in understanding why people commit these acts so that they can be prevented in the future. This research-intensive approach, however, is made more difficult by the fact that the perpetrators often commit suicide, or they are killed by police. Furthermore, the subsequent methods to monitor and identify prospective shooters, and to intervene before they commit murder, would likely infringe on suspected individuals’ rights. (It brings to mind the concept of “PreCrime” from the film and short story, Minority Report.)

The other option is to more strictly regulate the guns murderers use to commit these acts of violence. This option is comparatively simple, in a vacuum, but, in reality, it’s difficult to implement because of the politics involved.

I doubt that anything will change regarding gun ownership. No amount of tragedy seems sufficient enough for the 535 members of Congress to work cohesively towards defining what the right to bear arms should mean in the twenty-first century. If we are serious about eliminating mass shootings in this country, however, inaction is not an option.